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Could technology consulting be right for you?

9 Feb 20211.52k Views

Ever wondered what it’s like to work as a technology consultant? Three people from EY’s tech team discuss their careers.

Technology isn’t an industry with definite parameters and it needs people from every discipline – from ethics to engineering. That’s why people without typically technical skills can still enjoy a fulfilling career in the field.

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Digital transformation is continuing at pace, with emerging tech changing everything from how we deliver food to the ways we conduct surgery. In the past year, the majority of us have seen tech transform how we work.

But to keep up, companies need the right people with the right knowledge to help them streamline their processes, adopt more efficient systems and react positively to change. That’s where a technology consultant comes in.

If you’d like to sit at that cross section, to liaise with companies and customers about their tech needs, then technology consulting may be for you.

Today, tech consulting is an integral part of big consultancy firms. At EY, for example, there are plenty of people working with different clients and programmes with the ultimate goal of technology delivery.

Insights from experienced professionals

Paul Scullion is a senior manager for tech delivery in technology consulting at the company. Most of his time is spent with financial services clients, helping them with project management.

What he enjoys most is working with transformation programmes across the country. “Change programmes that are built to have a positive impact on the end customers’ lives and on the environment definitely instil a sense of personal pride in the work that we do,” he explained.

And there’s no time like the present to enter this growing industry, according to Scullion. At EY, the company is broadening its client base, making it an “extremely interesting time to join”.

“I would say go for it,” Scullion added. “It’s without a doubt the most positive move I have made in my career.”

Emily O’Brien, a senior manager in technology consulting, agrees. She has worked at EY for six years, but the “new capabilities” and “new offerings” in this area help keep her job exciting.

However, finding the right team and working environment is also important for a tech consultant. O’Brien said what she loves most about her job is the people and “getting to bring your full self to work every day”.

Entering technology consulting as a graduate

What’s it like to join the world of technology consulting as a graduate? Leanne Cassidy entered the graduate programme at EY just over two years ago. Now, she works as an operations engineer for the company’s technology transformation team, which involves troubleshooting, data analysis and testing.

Cassidy particularly enjoys the new challenges she’s faced with daily. “Working with a live system leaves room for daily challenges, which excites me,” she said.

“Technology consulting has expanded to incorporate a whole new range of technologies, including SAP and AI,” she said. “Since joining, I feel like I have gone from being part of a company that works with technology to being part of a technology company.”

‘If you are looking for something that is challenging, rewarding and exciting, technology consulting is the place to be’
– LEANNE CASSIDY

Though Cassidy is an engineer, she recommends a career in tech consulting for “anyone with an interest in technology”, whether you’re a “technical project manager, Java coder or a data specialist”.

“If you are looking for something that is challenging, rewarding and exciting, technology consulting is the place to be,” she said. “It’s meaningful work every day, using the newest technologies to make a difference.”

Thinking of a career in wide area of technology consulting? O’Brien shared some practical advice: “Look at the different opportunities that are there and consider what you’re passionate about and what suits your skillset best.”

Lisa Ardill
By Lisa Ardill

Lisa Ardill joined Silicon Republic as senior careers reporter in July 2019. She has a BA in neuroscience and a master’s degree in science communication. She is also a semi-published poet and a big fan of doggos. Lisa briefly served as Careers Editor at Silicon Republic before leaving the company in June 2021.

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