Dublin’s T-Pro snaps up Australian medical transcription service

11 Mar 2022

The T-Pro team. Image: T-Pro

T-Pro has snapped up Melbourne-based SyberScribe in its second international acquisition in six months.

Irish health-tech company T-Pro has acquired Australian medical transcription technology provider SyberScribe to grow its footprint in the Asia-Pacific region.

SyberScribe provides low-cost outsourced medical transcription services in large hospitals and clinics in the Australian healthcare sector. Established in 2003, the Melbourne-based company has grown to serve public and private healthcare institutions nationally.

Future Human

Dubin-based T-Pro is also focused on the healthcare sector, providing clinics and healthcare organisations with cloud-based tech for speech recognition, digital dictation and more.

T-Pro will now provide its artificial intelligence-powered speech technology to SyberScribe, in a move that will help the Irish company expand its footprint in Australia and New Zealand. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

“Reputation is always high on our strategic agenda when looking at potential acquisitions, and from day one it has been clear that SyberScribe has an outstanding reputation in the region,” said T-Pro CEO Jonathan Larbey, who co-founded the company more than a decade ago.

He said he was delighted to be starting the year working with the SyberScribe management team, which will allow T-Pro “to add real value” to the Asia-Pacific region.

“Existing customers can rest assured that we will continue to uphold the high standards of service that they are used to while also providing access to the latest innovations in speech and language technology,” Larbey added.

T-Pro ‘ahead of the game’

This is T-Pro’s second international acquisition in the past six months and will add to its new offices in India.

In an interview with the Business Post last month, Larbey talked about how technology had “supercharged” T-Pro from a company that outsourced typists to one that uses machine learning software to record speech on the cloud.

While typists are still used, they help the company’s machine learning algorithm learn faster and improve speech recognition. “What they do for us now is almost annotate the data from dictation received from doctors,” Larbey told the publication.

“The technology is so good that they don’t need to spend too much time editing to complete the document, so now they’ll tag concepts or definitions mentioned by doctors. So, we have this rich data that we can analyse and continue to improve the software.”

John Wollaston, managing director of SyberScribe, praised T-Pro for its “unique offering” which he believes is “ahead of the game” and will allow SyberScribe to offer technology to its clients “in a very non-disruptive way”.

“With T-Pro, SyberScribe will be able to deliver impactful cost and efficiency improvements to our existing clients, with next to no change management, while also offering a clear pathway towards digital transformation that doesn’t currently exist in the Asia-Pacific market,” he said of the acquisition.

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Vish Gain is a journalist with Silicon Republic

editorial@siliconrepublic.com