Why it makes sense to have more women in tech (infographic)

13 Nov 2015415 Shares

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Women are early adopters when it comes to technology

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The position of women in tech is something we spend a lot of time discussing here at Siliconrepublic.com.

Through our Women Invent campaign, we aim to highlight inspiring women in technology – from the legendary Hedy Lamarr to modern inspirations like astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Techmums founder Sue Black.

Silicon Republic is also the driving force behind Inspirefest, an international sci-tech festival that also aims to promote diversity in STEM.

And yet, though it is recognised by leading industry lights like Apple CEO Tim Cook and many more, that diversity is good for business, the fact is that gender diversity is still a huge problem in the tech industry, as the below infographic highlights.

In 2013, just 26pc of computing jobs in the US were held by women while only 11pc of all engineers in the US were women.

Less than 20pc of technical roles at Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Twitter were held by women when this infographic was compiled, despite the fact that women are the lead adopters of technology.

Read on for more statistics that may give you pause for thought, and click on the infographic if you want to see a larger version.

 

 

women-in-tech-2015

Women Invent is Silicon Republic’s campaign to champion the role of women in science, technology, engineering and maths. It has been running since March 2013, and is kindly supported by Intel, Open Eir (formerly Eircom Wholesale), Fidelity Investments, Accenture and CoderDojo.

Inspirefest is Silicon Republic’s international event connecting sci-tech professionals passionate about the future of STEM. Join us again from 30 June to 2 July 2016 for fresh perspectives on leadership, innovation and diversity. Get your Super Early Bird tickets now.

Woman on tablet image via Shutterstock

Brigid O Gorman is the sub-editor of Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com