Smart phone sales
on the increase


22 Feb 2005

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Driven by consumer desires to carry a single integrated device rather than multiple devices, sales of smart phones are forecast to grow 28pc a year until 2009. However, smart phones will not replace dedicated devices such as standard mobile phones, media players, cameras or game devices, analysts warn.

According to a new report entitled Integrated Handsets: Balancing Device Functionality with Consumer Desires from Jupiter Research, the majority of consumers will accept compromised functionality in order to obtain a single integrated device, such as a smart phone, if they prefer not to carry multiple devices.

As a result, smart phones will grow at a compound annual growth rate of 28pc until 2009, accounting for 9.3pc of handsets sold in 2009, up from 3.7pc in 2004. However, smart phones will not replace dedicated devices such as standard cell phones, media players, cameras or game devices.

The report found that 62pc of consumers prefer to carry a single device that adds additional features beyond telephony even if those features compromise advanced functions, size or battery life.

However, 74pc of consumers said that telephony remains the most important feature on a mobile device, clearly indicating that any combination of advanced features must not compromise telephony.

“Although our research indicates that consumers will carry up to three devices, they still prefer to carry a single integrated device to provide mobile functions,” said Michael Gartenberg, vice-president and research director at JupiterResearch.

“The key is: understanding what features are important to consumers in a given context and delivering them while being careful not compromise on the key mobile feature, telephony,” added Gartenberg.

By John Kennedy