DCM completes telephony network for Irish Rail


17 Apr 2003

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Dublin-based networking and communications firm DCM has completed the complex design and build of the largest private Qsig telephony network in Europe for Iarnród Éireann.

Qsig is a modern, powerful and intelligent inter-PINX (private integrated service network exchange) signalling system designed specifically to meet the requirements for sophisticated communications services. It provides a platform for future development supported by international standards organisations; a harmonised method for interconnecting multi-vendor equipment and synergy with the public ISDN and business applications developed for the public ISDN.

Built in conjunction with manufacturer Tadiran, it took DCM and Iarnród Éireann nearly 12 months to complete the testing of the network due to the stringent testing criteria for the rail network’s mission critical signalling system.

Iarnród Éireann (Irish Rail) had a concentrator signalling system in place that was becoming dated and in urgent need of replacement. Traditionally, organisations used PBX (private branch exchange) systems as a platform for voice communications to improve internal and external contact. The PBX systems in geographically remote sites were linked either by a public telecommunications network or by simple analogue ‘tie lines’, allowing the transfer of basic voice-band information between the PBXs. These simple networks were the forerunners of today’s complex networks.

DCM won the contract to design, supply and install a new digital line side emergency telephone system with built-in redundant routing and self-testing telephones. All systems and components had to be controlled and managed centrally. DCM networked over 60 systems and 1,000 self-diagnostic telephones.

By John Kennedy