Dell beefs up Irish consulting division


5 Mar 2007

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Dell is to beef up its Irish infrastructure consulting practice with a particular emphasis on server virtualisation as well as increasing resources in its document management services division, siliconrepublic.com has learned.

The move will square the company up against players like HP and Xerox in specific markets as well as closer to the market occupied by big-five consultancies like Deloitte, Accenture and Sogeti.

At present, Dell has a 40pc share of the Irish market across the three main hardware form factors of desktops, laptops and servers, according to IDC. The company has identified the need to be deeply involved in the infrastructure aspect of the IT market to deliver sustainable growth in the years ahead.

In an interview with siliconrepublic.com, the newly appointed general manager at Dell Ireland PJ Dwyer said that in 2007 his aim is to build on and develop the company’s current business units.

This will involve a particular focus on increasing capabilities in its infrastructure consulting practice in the areas of enterprise servers and storage.

“We’re building up our infrastructure consulting practice with a team of consultants that can offer assessments of customers’ enterprise needs,” said Dwyer, “covering areas like the Microsoft enterprise infrastructure and areas like software, messaging, databases and building in competencies.

“This will be a team who can offer a full service from the assessment of a business’s requirements through to the implementation, installation and after-sales support.”

Dwyer says that the team has 30 people at the moment consisting of general consultants and project managers as well as specialists in the areas of storage and virtualisation.

“The infrastructure consulting practice will have the full range of enterprise capabilities for companies like EMC, Microsoft, Oracle and Sureskills.”

Dwyer added that there will also be the focus on increasing the value-add and enterprise element of its printing division, moving into the market of outsourced office management and print services currently offered by players like Xerox.

By John Kennedy