Google logo history has a whole new chapter added

1 Sep 201531 Shares

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Google has decided to change things up with a new logo and ‘identity family’ that “shows you when the Google magic is working for you”. It’s four dots, a colourful mic and a new four-colour G.

In a gradual rollout, the tech giant is doing away with its old branding, adding another chapter to the Google logo history.

It’s probably about time, too. In the 17 years since Google emerged as a search engine, highlighting 10 web pages to users, plenty has changed.

Now we have Android phones supported by Google’s immense analytics. We use tools like Google Translate, Gmail, Chrome and Google Maps on a regular basis.

Multiple platforms, same old template. And online operators’ logos are more than just graphics, they’re often an interactive base.

With Google this is no different, thus a change to help users “even on the tiniest screens”.

I’ve looked around and it hasn’t updated on my desktop computer just yet – although I’m using Safari, so maybe I’m being penalised. My Android phone, and a few others in here, have the new signage, though.

Oh, now my browser has it. So the rollout has been pretty quick, it seems.

As with all rebrands, be they small or large, it’s difficult to establish an opinion on it just yet. But I’m sure it will all make sense pretty quickly.

“This isn’t the first time we’ve changed our look and it probably won’t be the last, but we think today’s update is a great reflection of all the ways Google works for you across Search, Maps, Gmail, Chrome and many others,” said Google in a blog post.

“We think we’ve taken the best of Google (simple, uncluttered, colourful, friendly), and recast it not just for the Google of today, but for the Google of the future.”

Google logo history gif

 

 

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com