Intel buys Itseez to give autonomous cars 20:20 vision

27 May 201633 Shares

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Intel’s latest acquisition sees it further its stake not only in the internet of things (IoT), but also within the connected car field, with its acquisition of computer vision (CV) algorithm developer, Itseez.

Based in the heart of Silicon Valley, Itseez is one of the growing number of start-ups working to produce software within CV for use in the auto industry.

As cars transition from driven, to semi-autonomous and, finally, autonomous, a car’s sensors will be its eyes and ears to the outside world, allowing it to avoid hazards and obstacles, and meaning it needs to be connected to the outside world via the IoT.

Intel has obviously taken a shine to Itseez, so much so that it has decided to acquire it for its CV technology to help it “win in automotive”, as well as allowing its software to be used in other IoT devices, such as security systems and medical imaging equipment.

With the purchase of Itseez, Intel said that it will now be able to use its algorithms and implementations for embedded and specialised hardware, which is helpful considering Itseez’s software has been tuned and integrated in many major CV products on the market.

Intel warning example

Image via Intel

Closely tied with Intel’s IoT vision

In an announcement from Doug Davis, senior vice-president and general manager of Intel’s IoT division, Intel has said Itseez will play a crucial role in its IoT roadmap – to pardon the pun – starting with its contribution to what it sees as the second phase of IoT development.

This phase being the connecting of previously unconnected devices using advanced communications systems, with the third phase being IoT devices capable of quickly responding to their surroundings and using AI to come to their own conclusions.

“This acquisition furthers Intel’s efforts to win in IoT market segments like automotive and video,” Davis said, “where the ability to electronically perceive and understand images paves the way for innovation and opportunity.”

Car image via Shutterstock

Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com