Twitter snaps up app crash-reporting start-up Crashlytics

29 Jan 20135 Shares

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Image via Crashlytics

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Twitter has acquired the Boston-based start-up Crashlytics, which has developed a reporting tool to help developers figure out what causes their apps to crash.

Founded in 2011 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, by Jeff Seibert and Wayne Chang, Crashlytics has created technology to deliver insights to developers about why their apps have crashed, including pinpointing the exact lines of code that caused the crash.

The company provides crash reports solely for iOS apps at the minute, but Crashlytics is working on an Android version of the tool.

Twitter already uses Crashlytics in its own app, as well as Vine, Yelp, Kayak, TaskRabbit and Waze.

Via its blog, Crashlytics revealed it is merging with Twitter, although the company did not disclose the terms of the deal.

Chang said Crashlytics started out to address a gap in mobile development. The company’s tool allows developers to build a crash-reporting feature into their apps.

“With hundreds of millions of devices in use around the world, it was impossible for developers to fully test every edge-case and catch every bug before release,” he wrote.

Change said “much will remain the same” for Crashlytics following the Twitter acquisition. He said the company would continue to work with its existing customers to deliver app performance insights.

“Going forward, we’re thrilled to work with the incredible team at Twitter. We share a passion for innovating on mobile and building world-class applications. Joining forces will accelerate our build-out, allowing us to leverage Twitter’s infrastructure to deliver new features faster than ever,” he added.

Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey welcomed the company to the team via a tweet.

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Carmel was a long-time reporter with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com