13 schools in Cork to receive 100Mbs fibre broadband

3 Oct 20131 Share

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Magnus Ternsjö, CEO of UPC Ireland, with Bishopstown Community School students Hubert Lysiak, Amanda Jaunzema, Beauty Aihie and Jay Rall

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Thirteen schools in Co Cork are being connected to 100Mbs fibre broadband, courtesy of a partnership between telecoms firm UPC and Ireland’s national education and research network HEAnet, as part of the nationwide Schools Broadband Scheme.

The schools include Bishopstown Community School, St Killian’s Special School and St Gabriel’s Special School, Bishopstown; Scoil Réalt na Maidine and Maria Assumpta Girls National School, Ballyphehane; Gaelscoil an Ghoirt Alainn, Montenotte; Riverstown National School, Glanmire; Scoil Náisiúnta Bhreanndáin, An Ghleann; Naomh Eoin Easpal, Scoil Mhuire Banrion and Mayfield Community School, Mayfield; Strawberry Hill Boys National School, Sunday’s Well; and Scoil Oilibhéir, Dublin Hill.

John Farrell, deputy principal of Bishopstown Community School, said access to technology and digital media is essential for social inclusion and future career prospects, and it forms a key element of the total school curriculum.

“We are very pleased with the high quality broadband access that has now been provided for our school and we will use it to the maximum possible for the benefit of our students throughout our classrooms, technology rooms and science labs,” Farrell said.

Magnus Ternsjö, CEO of UPC Ireland, said the provision of superfast broadband in schools is vital to ensure children are equipped with the resources needed to flourish in today’s school system and digital economy. 

“We have invested over €500m in our fibre-powered network, which is enabling these developments,” Ternsjö said, adding that a UPC-commissioned report conducted by Amárach Research on Ireland’s digital future found that the digital economy has the potential to create 18,000 jobs.

Tina held senior editorial positions at daily newspapers in Ottawa and Toronto

editorial@siliconrepublic.com