Lero awarded €627,000 in EU funding for Fastfix project


5 Jul 2010

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Lero, the Irish Software Engineering Research Centre, has secured funding of €627,672 over a period of 30 months under the EU Framework 7 programme (FP7) for its contribution to the Fastfix project.

The Fastfix project’s goal is to provide software developers with a maintenance environment that combines time efficiency with low-cost and high precision.

Lero researchers at University of Limerick (UL) and University College Dublin (UCD) will work on the Fastfix project, which has overall funding of €3.48m. Lero will contribute mainly in the area of autonomic software, in particular providing support for remote diagnosis and repair.
 
Fastfix will develop a platform and a set of tools that will continuously monitor customer environments, while collecting information on application execution and user interaction. The overall objective is to identify symptoms of execution errors, performance degradation, or changes in user behaviour. By using correlation techniques, the platform will also support failure replication in order to identify incorrect execution patterns and, in particular cases, automatically generate and deploy remedial patches.

“This is a major success for Lero and for Ireland. We are partners in a very important project for software developers who will benefit enormously from its outcome. We are very pleased to have been awarded this funding,” said Prof Mike Hinchey, director of Lero.

The Fastfix project partners, apart from Lero, include the prestigious TU Munich and a number of leading-edge SMEs. The project began recently in Valencia, Spain, and will continue until November 2012.

Lero is a collaborative organisation, embracing the software-engineering research activities in UL (lead partner), Dublin City University, Trinity College Dublin and UCD. It was established in November 2005 with support from Science Foundation Ireland’s CSET (Centre for Science, Engineering and Technology) programme.