Vodafone embarks on green drive to cut paper bills by 70pc

9 Feb 2011

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Ireland’s largest mobile operator Vodafone has asked customers to opt to switch to paperless billing as part of its drive to cut down on paper by 70pc. The move, it says, will be equal to saving 5,000 trees and 500 tonnes of CO2.

The company today launched its paperless billing campaign ‘Goodbye Paper Bills, Hello Trees’ and calls on Vodafone customers to make the switch to paperless billing.

For every 72 customers who switch to paperless billing, not only will a tree be saved, but Vodafone pledges to plant an additional tree at one of four Tree Council of Ireland-approved rural woodland areas in Munster, Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. 

According to new data from Vodafone, reducing the company’s annual billing paper consumption by 70pc will save almost 5,000 trees and 500 tonnes of CO2 per annum.

Making sure our environment doesn’t foot the bill

Vodafone Ireland consumes the equivalent of 7,200 trees per year or 3.6 hectares in billing paper annually.

Since Vodafone began to promote paperless billing in November 2010, more than 42,000 Vodafone customers are now on paperless billing.

Vodafone has already reduced its CO2 emissions by 34pc since 2008, through a range of measures in energy, transport and waste and handset recycling.

“This campaign is a call to action for our customers to make the switch to paperless billing, which reduces our environmental impact, saves the company money and supports our green agenda,” explained Laura Turkington, Vodafone Foundation and corporate responsibility manager.

“As a major company, with more than 2.4m customers, every customer who switches to paperless billing will make a real difference to our carbon footprint and help us fly the green flag by planting forests in each province,” Turkington said.

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com