Walgreens to add EV charging stations at 800 US stores this year


26 Jul 2011

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Drugstore chain Walgreens has revealed plans to offer electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at around 800 locations across the United States by the end of the year, making it the country’s largest retail host.

The company said its neighbourhood stores will provide convenient locations for EV drivers to recharge near home or work.

The charging stations will feature either a high-speed direct current (DC) charger that can add 30 miles of range in just 10 minutes of charging time, or a Level 2 charger that can add up to 25 miles of range per hour of charge.

Major markets expected to host these sites include Boston, Denver, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Washington DC. Charging stations will also be installed at select locations in Florida, New Jersey, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington.

Installations are beginning this month.

Walgreens already has installations under way for EV charging stations at more than 60 stores across Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth and Chicago.

“Consumer interest and enthusiasm has been incredible and we’re excited to provide locations to charge up in neighbourhoods across the country,” said Mark Wagner, Walgreens president of community management and operations.

Wagner said that, as more Americans embrace environmentally sustainable technologies, his company’s convenient locations make it uniquely positioned to help address the concern around accessibility or ‘range confidence’.

“According to the Department of Energy, Walgreens will make up as much as 40pc of all public EV charging stations across the country, making it easy for EV drivers to look to our stores for a quick charge near major highways, metropolitan areas or right in their neighbourhood.”

Article courtesy of Businessandleadership.com