Broadband provider goes on election trail


12 Aug 2003

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Louth-based broadband provider DigiWeb has gone all political in its efforts to drive broadband into key urban areas in the north-east, calling on local interests and representatives to push for broadband availability in their town and region.

The company has developed an online petition encouraging interested locals in the Louth, Meath and Cavan areas to “vote for broadband”.

DigiWeb has introduced wireless broadband services this year into a number of rural and regional areas that larger telecoms operators tend to ignore.

The company has already launched services throughout several regional and urban areas in County Louth and will be announcing services in locations throughout Meath and Cavan over the next few weeks.

DigiWeb has been selected by both the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources and by the Border Midland Western Regional Assembly in their respective calls for broadband services rollout in the regions.

According to DigiWeb managing director Colm Piercy, the act of residents and local interests registering their interest in broadband has proven effective in other countries and has been encouraged in the most recent report from the Telecoms Strategy Group.

He added that the company would prioritise any location that can demonstrate a demand level of 30 businesses or 60 home users – lower than levels mooted by Eircom when it unveiled its triggering strategy for ADSL yesterday.

“We’ve been inundated with requests to deliver broadband in locations throughout the country, so we’ve established this online registration to provide an indicator as to level and location of demand,” Piercy explained.

“Unlike the ‘trigger’ levels indicated by the larger operators, our technical and economic models permit us to deliver cost-effective broadband services in much smaller regions. We’re keen to meet with any local interests who wish to accelerate broadband availability in their town or region,” Piercy said.

By John Kennedy