ISA courting more entrants to its software awards


21 Aug 2006

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The Irish Software Association (ISA) has called for more indigenous firms to apply for its annual awards and said that a thriving local software sector is important for the wider aim of establishing a knowledge economy.

Speaking at the launch of the ISA’s annual software awards, the chairman of the ISA Bernie Cullinan said she wanted to see more nominations from Irish software firms and pointed out that previous winners have gone on to international success.

“Without a healthy indigenous software sector Ireland’s knowledge economy will be stunted,” she said. “Irish software companies, such as previous winners Norkon, Valista, Trintech and Qumas, have been successful in an international market. These companies have achieved sufficient revenues enabling them to achieve international scale.”

ISA director Michele Quinn said that growing beyond the domestic market was necessary to achieve scale. “Many Irish software firms have the ability to become international leaders if they can achieve revenues in the €20-50m range,” she said. “However, many find it impossible to make more than €5m in the domestic market because of its size. They require advice and government support to secure the business needed to compete internationally.”

This year’s ISA awards will take place at Dublin’s Burlington Hotel on 10 November. There are five prize categories: company of the year; new company of the year; technical innovation; sales achievement of the year; and partnership of the year. In addition, a student medal will be awarded for the most commercially viable software developed. This award is intended to help foster closer links between business and Irish third-level institutions.

Companies can nominate themselves through the ISA website at www.software.ie.

By Gordon Smith