Microsoft begins 90-day countdown to the end of support for Windows XP

8 Jan 20141 Share

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On 8 April, Microsoft will end support for Windows XP and Office 2003, opening users up to potential security risks if they haven’t upgraded to a newer operating system.

Microsoft last night kicked off a 90-day countdown to the end of support for the 12-year-old operating system.

Last year, IDC estimated that the longer users put off migrating to a new operating system, the more expensive it is to support old versions, like Windows XP

IT labour costs are likely to go up 25pc in the fourth year of continuing to run Windows XP past deadline.

The software giant said failing to upgrade to a newer operating system will leave businesses without insurance if IT failure affects processes.

The fatal countdown

Microsoft also said systems will be faced with chronic, even fatal, IT health issues.

“Laptops from 2001 are heavy, clunky machines – today’s laptops are thin, light and truly mobile,” said Patrick Ward, Windows business lead for Microsoft Ireland.

“Old PCs are much slower to boot up and shut down – modern devices boot in seconds, saving time. Software starts quicker, search is easier – further enhancing productivity. Improved productivity, lower power consumption and reduced support costs mean modern PCs save businesses money,” Ward said.

Emphasising how much the world has changed since Windows XP debuted in 2001, Microsoft pointed out that back then smartphones and apps didn’t exist, DVDs and CDs were just over-taking VHS videos, dial-up was the main method of getting online, Eminem’s Lose Yourself was No 1 in the charts and Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was the top film of the year.

Countdown image via Shutterstock

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com