Nearly half of Irish IT decision makers unaware of what gadgets employees bring to work

3 Oct 2012

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Matthew McCann, director, Ricoh Ireland

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A study of 227 Irish IT decision makers reveals that 48pc haven’t a clue what personal devices are being used by their employees to create documents for work-related activities and more than a third have no policy in place to protect their business documents.

The Ricoh study reveals that 57pc of central IT departments don’t have full visibility on all business documents created and held across their organisations.

Some 77pc believe it is getting more difficult to effectively manage and secure all business documents.

The average time it takes an Irish IT department to retrieve a business document is 25 minutes.

On the bright side, 62pc of the IT decision makers say their organisations use e-invoicing, which means they are no longer entirely stuck in the dark ages.

Information capital

“With the ongoing explosion in data, documents and devices, Irish organisations are finding it increasingly complex to manage and safeguard all of their information capital,” Ricoh Ireland director Matthew McCann said. 

“The results of the survey highlight the huge disparity which exists between the desire for better control and visibility of business documents and the actual lack of systems and policies that are currently in place.

“Irish businesses need to act now or they will suffer increased loss of productivity, poor customer service and are at increased risk of losing critical business information. On top of this, they are open to fines or worse from local and international authorities if they are found to be non-compliant with legislation in this area,” McCann warned.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com