Netwatch co-founder named CIO of the Year in US

13 Jun 2012

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Niall Kelly, co-founder and chief technical officer of Carlow-based security company Netwatch, has been named 2012 CIO of the Year by the Boston Business Journal and Mass High Tech.

The award, reviewed and selected by a team of editors, is given to those who exemplify innovation in the use of information technology and in IT strategy. Winners of the prestigious awards were honoured at a ceremony in Boston yesterday.

The award helps to solidify Netwatch’s emergence as a leader in the security space since its entry into to the US market in February of 2012.

Kelly, who also drives the research and development department of Netwatch, has lead Netwatch to receive several accolades in Ireland, including Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, the Deloitte Fast 50 Technology Award and the Business & Finance Enterprise of the Year Award. This is the company’s first US award since launching in Boston earlier this year.

“Niall’s determination and dedication to our technology ensures that our customers across the globe receive the highest possible service available," said David Walsh, Group CEO of Netwatch.

“We are honoured to see his hard work and innovation rewarded by such a well-respected publication at such an early stage of a company’s US life."

Real-time remote video monitoring

Netwatch provides real-time remote security monitoring to businesses and private residences in Ireland, Europe and around the globe.

Headquartered in Carlow, Ireland, with offices in Boston, Netwatch protects customers across industries including retail, logistics, warehousing, automotive, construction, hardware, manufacturing, public sector and utilities.  

Intervention specialists at the Netwatch Communications Hub direct operations through remote close circuit TV (CCTV) monitoring and intervene as soon as a security is breached, alerting the intruders to the fact they are being watched and that the police have been informed.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com