Smart in €1.5m
data centre deal


3 Apr 2006

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Up-and-coming telecoms and broadband player Smart Telecom said today that it has signed a 10-year data centre contract with Dublin-based Interxion.

Under this new agreement, Smart Telecom will be provided with data centre services by Interxion Ireland for the next 10 years. Essentially, Interxion Ireland will consolidate and house Smart Telecom’s core network and voice services infrastructure, guaranteeing availability and uptime for Smart Telecom’s voice and data services to its entire customer base.

The deployment affords Smart the flexibility to quickly and effectively scale up its infrastructure as demand for services increase.

“We have had a relationship with Interxion Ireland for over two and a half years and their service and support during this time is the primary reason we selected them as one of our key suppliers,” explained Joe Lavin, head of voice services at Smart Telecom.

The move essentially means that as well as offering traditional telecommunications services, Smart Telecom can now offer a complete suite of business-based technology solutions to existing and future customers. These services are delivered across a totally resilient infrastructure, the company said.

“Smart Telecom has been a valuable member of our existing carrier community,” commented Tanya Duncan, managing director of Interxion Ireland. “This consolidation project allows Smart Telecom to take full advantage of our data centre facilities and support services.”

Last week it emerged that Smart is attempting to raise a €100m war chest through Davy Stockbrokers to wage a High Court legal battle against the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg) over the regulator’s attempt to revoke its 3G licence. If Smart is unsuccessful in its battle with ComReg, its licence could revert to Eircom or its new subsidiary Meteor.

By John Kennedy