Twitter releases Fabric mobile app to give developers crash data on the move

24 Feb 20164 Shares

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The new fabric apps will give developers the power to take action if problems with apps emerge while they on the move

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Twitter has released an iOS and Android version of its popular Fabric platform for developers, enabling them to see what’s happening with their apps when they are away from their computers.

Up until now, Fabric, a mainstay tool for developers, has only been available as a web interface.

Having the app on either iOS or Android devices gives developers the means to take action on their smartphones or tablets.

Fabric is centred around Crashlytics, Twitter’s tool for discovering issues in apps.

The new app features push notifications for real-time updates on issues, for example, if an app suddenly starts crashing.

Developers can control notifications on a per-app basis and an activity feed lists activity, almost like a Twitter timeline.

Stabilise apps via mobile devices

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“Since we launched Fabric in 2014, our mission has been to make tools that let you focus on building the best apps,” said Meekal Bajaj, product manager at Fabric.

“Crashlytics and Answers have made it easy to see your app’s stability. But crashes don’t always happen when you are at your desk. And when time is of the essence, having the right context at your fingertips can make all the difference.”

Bajaj said that the Fabric mobile app makes it easy for you to know what’s going on with your app.

“We sift through millions of events every day to intelligently give you the most important information. And, starting today, our real-time alerting system will send you a push notification when something critical is affecting your app.”

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com