Apple’s power cable woes continue amid USB-C recall

16 Feb 20169 Shares

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Apple has announced a recall plan for certain USB-C power cables used in MacBooks sold around last summer. Yet another power issue for the tech giant.

A “limited number” of USB-C power cables are faulty, people, meaning if you bought a slim MacBook between March and June last year you may need a new one.

Worse, still, if you bought a cable separately to buying a MacBook, you could need a replacement, too.

That’s because a “design issue” means the USB-C cables that were such a chore to begin with may not charge your device at all, or only intermittently.

Free replacement

Announcing the news on its website earlier in the week, Apple said it will provide a new “redesigned” variant, free of charge, to eligible customers. Eligibility, presumably, means receipt holders.

If you went all legit when you bought your MacBook and registered it with a valid mailing address, Apple will send you a new replacement cable by the end of the month.

Also, for anyone who bought a replacement MacBook because of this issue, you’re encouraged to contact Apple to try sort out a refund.

Affected cables have “Designed by Apple in California. Assembled in China” on them. Whereas the new, redesigned cables include a serial number after that text.

Apple cable

Apple USB-C cables, bad (top) and good (bottom)

More bad news

It’s been a shocking start to the year so far for Apple (no apologies for that pun), after  the company announced a voluntary recall of AC wall plug adapters with two prongs designed for use in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Continental Europe, New Zealand and South Korea.

Apple said that in “very rare cases” Apple two-pronged plug AC adapters may break and create a risk of electrical shock if touched.

Apple said customers should visit here for details about how to exchange the affected adapters for new, redesigned ones.

Main MacBook image via mamma_mia/Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com