Apple to save design overhaul until 2017 for 10th anniversary of iPhone

22 Jun 201629 Shares

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Apple is saving a major redesign of the iPhone until 2017 to mark the 10th anniversary of the device that changed the tech world forever.

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Aside from the loss of the headphone jack, reports suggest there are no big changes expected in Apple’s new iPhone. However, that may all change in 2017, when the iPhone is 10.

If you look at an iPhone 6 and compare it with an iPhone 6s they are identical.

So, since it is almost two years since the iPhone 6 launched, it is time for a whole new design for the trusty iPhone, right?

You may be wrong.

According to the Wall Street Journal, citing sources familiar with the plans, Apple is breaking with tradition and will save its major design overhaul of the iPhone until 2017 to mark the 10th anniversary of the device that changed technology forever.

For its latest trick, instead of revealing a whole new shape to the iPhone, Apple is understood to be keeping the iPhone 6 and 6s chassis in the current 4.7in and 5.5in configurations, albeit without an actual headphone jack, which is big news in itself.

Instead, the Lightning connector will serve as both a port for charging the phone and as the headphone jack.

This will have a material effect in terms of making the 4.7in and 5.5in devices even slimmer.

Apple is also understood to be improving the water resistance capabilities of the iPhone.

So what might be in store for the iPhone in 2017? Well, one of the biggest rumours is that Apple may eliminate the fingerprint sensor and home button on the front of the device and will instead build the fingerprint sensor into the OLED display.

iPhone main image via Shutterstock

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com