Apple set to double share of computer market


4 Feb 2008

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Apple’s share of the global computing market is set to double from the present 5pc to 10pc by 2011, its success reflecting the expected failure of the PC industry to enable software integration that provides ease of use and flexibility.

According to the latest Gartner predictions, Apple’s share of the US and western European computer markets will double.

Apple, it says, is challenging its competitors with software integration that provides ease of use and flexibility. It is also demonstrating more frequent innovation in hardware and software, having developed a powerful ecosystem that focuses on interoperability across multiple devices such as the iPod and iMac, which create cross-selling opportunities.

Among Gartner’s other predictions is a forecast that by 2012 some 50pc of travelling workers will leave their notebooks at home in favour of other devices.

This is despite the fact that notebooks are continuing to shrink in size and weight. It seems that workers lament the inconvenience of carrying them on their business trips.

New classes of internet-centric pocket devices will emerge at a sub-€300 level and server and web-based applications that can be accessed from everywhere will continue to proliferate.

Gartner predicts that by 2012, 80pc of all commercial software in the world will include elements of open source technology.

By the same year, at least one third of business applications spending will be as service subscriptions with software as a service (SaaS) receiving the endorsement of Oracle, SAP and Microsoft, as well as e-commerce and applications vendors like Google and Amazon.

By 2011, early technology adopters will forgo capital expenditures and instead purchase 40pc of their IT infrastructure as a service.

The green agenda is also prominent in Gartner’s forecast. By 2009, more than a third of IT organisations will have one or more environmental criteria among their top six buying criteria and, by 2010, 75pc of organisations will use full life cycle energy and CO2 footprint as mandatory PC-buying criteria.

Gartner says that by 2011, suppliers to large global enterprises will need to provide their green credentials via an audited process to retain preferred supplier status. For example, Timberland has already launched a “Green Index” environmental rating for its shoes and boots.

By John Kennedy