BBC revs into top gear with science programming


19 Jan 2010

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Science buffs, enthusiasts and school kids alike have an exciting TV year ahead of them as the BBC revealed its schedule to celebrate the 350th year of the Royal Society as well as get people excited about all things science.

The Mythbusters-esque Bang Goes The Theory show, which debuted in July 2009 with a live TV promo is back and doing a show that involves driving a coffee-powered car from London to Manchester. Who knew cars guzzled caffeine?

There will also be Top Ten Advances as presented by science personality Ray Winston, which will feature the professor’s favourite advances in the world of science in the last 50 years as well as other science shows, including the Human series that brings the viewer on a journey through the human body and its history.

Science fiction and fantasy author Terry Pratchett will be giving the 34th annual Richard Dimbleby Lecture, in which he will be talking about modern society and how it sees death. Pratchett was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2007 and is a patron of the Alzheimer’s Research Trust. Who better seeing as death features in all of his Discworld novels?

There is also a drive to encourage amateur scientists to come out of the woodwork with the radio 4 show So You Want To Be A Scientist?

This drive follows accusations of impartiality in science coverage and an announcement earlier this month by governing body, the BBC Trust, that it will be conducting a review into both the impartiality and accuracy of said coverage.