Drone crashes into White House while Obama visits India

26 Jan 2015

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

US security services were being questioned after a quadcopter drone was found to have made its way onto the grounds of the White House before crashing aimlessly into the iconic building.

It hasn’t been a particularly good month for drones with news just last week showing a drug-laden drone couldn’t cope with its payload and was crashed in a Mexican supermarket.

Now however, the home of the US president was ‘under attack’, or at least as much as a small commercial drone is capable of with no weaponry whatsoever.

In fact, the drone was found on the lawn of the White House last night but didn’t seem to bother the security team guarding one of the most security-conscious sites in the entire world.

According to ABC News, spokesperson for the US secret service, Brian Leary, issued a statement on the incident saying, "At approximately 3.08 am, a secret service uniformed division officer posted on the south grounds of the White House complex heard and observed a 'quad-copter' device, approximately two feet in diameter, flying at a very low altitude and ultimately crashing on the southeast side of the complex. There was an immediate alert and lockdown of the complex until the device was examined and cleared.”

Whoever felt the need to fly the drone into the White House grounds are obviously not very up-to-date on current affairs as both Barack Obama and the First Lady, Michelle Obama, are currently thousands of kilometres away in India on a state visit.

As for what will happen now, the secret service say a full investigation will now be underway.

The White House at night image via Shutterstock

66

DAYS

4

HOURS

26

MINUTES

Buy your tickets now!

Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com