Google Maps for iOS returns to the App Store with Street View

13 Dec 2012

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Google for iOS has returned to Apple’s App Store with a range of new features, including Street View, voice, turn-by-turn navigation and even a developer SDK.

The new Google Maps app for iOS is compatible with all iOS devices extending back to the iPhone 3GS.

The app lets users save their favourite locations, as well as discover places to eat, drink, shop and more.

It also comes with live traffic information in cities across the world, as well as voice-guided turn-by-turn driving directions.

A cool and welcome addition is Street View, which gives smartphone and tablet users a 360-degree panorama of places around the world.

The interface has been streamlined and is certainly faster to use.

Writing in the Google Geo Developers Blog, senior product manager Andrew Foster said: “With the Google Maps SDK for iOS, developers can feature Google Maps in their applications on the iPod touch, iPhone, and iPad. Also, the SDK makes it simple to link to Google Maps for iPhone from inside your app, enabling your users to easily search and get directions.”

google street view

He said the developers SDK features vector-based maps that load quickly, allowing users to easily navigate 2D and 3D views, rotating and tilting the map with simple gestures inside your app.

“Developers can also change the Google Maps view to include information such as traffic conditions, and control camera positions in 3D.”

Access to API keys is being progressively rolled out to developers who register interest, Foster said.

The arrival of the new Google Maps app is timely, considering the fact that as Apple’ travails with its own Maps app continue, Australian police had to warn users about Apple’s Maps app on iPhones because incorrect information was putting lives in danger.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com