Grooveshark music-streaming app back on Google Play

29 Aug 20123 Shares

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

After removing the controversial music-streaming service from its app store more than a year ago, Google has now reinstated Grooveshark back in Google Play for Android devices.

The music streaming service from Escape Media Group, which came to fruition in 2006, now has in the region of 30m monthly users. Via Grooveshark users can upload songs and then share them with other users via various forms of social media, including Facebook and Twitter.

Grooveshark is in the midst of being sued by major record label groups, including Universal Music, Sony Music Entertainment and Warner Music in relation to copyright infringements.

Back in April 2011 Google pulled the Grooveshark app from the Android Market, apparently due to terms of service violation. The move from Google came after Apple removed Grooveshark from the App Store in 2010.

After it was reinstated back into Google Play yesterday, Grooveshark indicated that it had been working with the internet giant in recent times to remove "rogue apps".

Here’s a copy of the statement that Grooveshark has issued, as reported by CNET: "After working closely with Google to get rogue apps removed, we’re delighted that the official Grooveshark app has been reinstated in the Android market. Grooveshark is dedicated to helping music fans search, discover and share music while pioneering new artist promotion, distribution and monetization techniques. We look forward to continuing to build a relationship with Android and leverage this fantastic platform for our partners."

Grooveshark operates a free service with advertising. On its website it states that the songs on the service provided by wither record labels, independent artists and users themselves who can upload music. It claims that it has licences to distribute the catalogue of over 1,000 labels as well as the music of over 25,000 independent artists.

Carmel was a long-time reporter with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com