iFixit strips down Apple Watch, questions the battery

24 Apr 20151 Share

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The team over at iFixit has just acquired, and taken apart, the new Apple Watch – what they’ve found is pretty nifty.

The images give us a remarkably close look at what goes into the smartwatch, with some of the tiniest screws imaginable holding together the components that make up something an awful lot of people are getting excited about.

The taptic engine and digital crown are shown in all their glory, while the small 205 mAh battery size does raise a few questions.

“[It] seems miniscule in comparison to the 300 mAh batteries found in the Moto 360 and Samsung Gear Live. Hopefully, Apple’s Watch OS will help the battery stand the test of time and avoid the problems that initially plagued the Moto 360,” says iFixit.

However, the coolest thing the team shows us is the innards of the Apple Watch in comparison to a pocket watch from the 1800s.

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On the right, a pocket watch mechanism, circa 1890. On the left, the 2015 Apple Watch.

The tools used to strip down Apple’s new device look entirely different to those used to mend an older watch, however, when you look closely they largely do the same thing.

Also, clearly older timepieces are far more beautifully constructed products.

iFixit shows that the antenna – which it investigates thoroughly – features Apple’s classic gold treatment that can also be found in the 2015 Retina MacBook, this is surprising given that they’re merely looking through the entry-level Apple Watch Sport.

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The opening screen of the Apple Watch slowed the Teardown, with iFixit enjoying its beauty

But all in all it’s a remarkable piece of work from iFixit, and the team’s progress can be seen here.

Gordon Hunt is a journalist at Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com