Nintendo Wii price set to drop 20pc

25 Sep 2009

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Games giant Nintendo is to drop the price of its popular Nintendo Wii games console by 20pc in time for the busy Q4 sales season, mirroring similar moves by Microsoft’s Xbox 360 and the Sony PlayStation 3.

Starting in the US, Nintendo is to reduce the suggested retail price for the Wii by US$50 to US$199.99.

The new US$199.99 Wii price point delivers the full iconic Wii gaming experience, including the motion-sensing Wii Remote controller, Nunchuck controller and Wii Sports software, and furthers Nintendo’s mission to expand the gaming universe by making video games accessible to more and more consumers.

Wii ownership also opens an avenue for players to the industry’s most diverse and unique collection of home console games. Key upcoming releases include Wii Fit Plus, launching on 4 October, and the first truly multiplayer Mario title ever, New Super Mario Bros Wii.

“Wii has reached more video-game players than any game system before because it attracts everyone — both men and women, and people of all ages,” said Cammie Dunaway, Nintendo of America’s executive vice-president of Sales & Marketing.

“Our research shows there are 50 million Americans thinking about becoming gamers, and this more affordable price point and our vast array of new software mean many of them can now make the leap and find experiences that appeal to them, whatever their tastes or level of gaming experience.”

The inherent social nature of Wii is fully demonstrated in a groundbreaking way with New Super Mario Bros Wii, the first Mario game ever to allow four players to take part in the action at the same time.

By John Kennedy

Photo, topmost: The Nintendo Wii games console.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com