More shocking news as Microsoft recalls 2.2m power cords sold with Surface Pro

3 Feb 201624 Shares

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Microsoft has received reports of AC cords overheating and emitting flames and five reports of electrical shock to consumers

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Just days after Apple announced a voluntary recall of AC adapters, its rival Microsoft has begun a recall of some 2.25m AC power cords that came with its Surface Pro convertible tablet devices due to a shock hazard.

The recall involves AC power cords sold with Microsoft Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2 and Surface Pro 3 computers before 15 March 2015.

Microsoft has received reports of AC cords overheating and emitting flames and five reports of electrical shock to consumers.

The recall also involves accessory power units that include an AC power cord.

Tech giants are getting all wound up over power safety issues

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission says that consumers should unplug and stop using the recalled power cords and contact Microsoft for a free replacement AC power cord.

“If the cord is wound too tightly, twisted or pinched over an extended period of time there is a potential risk for the AC cord– the cord that connects the power supply unit to the electrical socket – to overheat,” Microsoft said in a blog post.

“While there are no reports of serious injury, a small number of our customers have reported this issue and we are taking action to address by making free replacement cords available to all eligible customers. The safety of our customers is our top priority.”

Last week, Apple announced it was voluntarily recalling AC wall plug adapters with two prongs designed for use in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, continental Europe, New Zealand and South Korea. The adapters shipped with Mac and certain iOS devices between 2003 and 2015.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com