Technology and art collide at Tweak festival


14 Sep 2009

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Running from 21-26 September, the Tweak festival brings a thought-provoking multimedia experience of interactive art and live electronic music performances to Limerick.

In its second year, Tweak aims to marry technology and society through art by taking a look at how we interact with and view the digital world.

The festival will have an international array of speakers, performers, designers, exhibitions, films, visual artists and DJs, all from an eclectic range of backgrounds, including Berlin-based artist Jens Wunderling who will use his art installations to take a look at social media like Twitter, and how they impact on society.

Artists Tim Redfern and Ralph Borland will have smSage, as featured in the New York Times; a seemingly ordinary surveillance camera that accepts SMS messages and using text-to-voice software it quotes randomly from the SMS stream, loudly and quietly, with no pattern. An exhibition designed to disquiet and disturb; a rambling mad man on the street corner in a surveillance society.

Unlike last year, there will also be three full-day workshops open to the public as well as plenty of evening events. If you like robots then sign up now, as Brock Craft, John Nussey and Ryan Jordan are running a crash course in Arduino. Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It will introduce attendees to the basics of using it in conjunction with pure data to create live performances and get your robot moving.

If interactive art installations or workshops in robotics aren’t enough, the entire festival will be wrapped up with several music events, including Noise Night, a live electronic late-night concert featuring popular Irish purveyors of soundscapes Sunken Foal.

By Marie Boran, via Gadgetrepublic.com