Vodafone defends consumers’ smartphones with new security software

13 Aug 201522 Shares

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More and more smartphones are coming under increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks

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The increasing security threat to consumers’ smartphones in terms of malware and viruses has prompted Vodafone to launch Secure Net, which will cost 99c per month following a free trial.

The new software is aimed at protecting consumers while mobile browsing to defend them against phishing and malware attacks.

Vodafone Secure Net also features parental controls that allow parents to protect their children from unsafe content via their mobile devices by blocking unsuitable websites and pre-determined apps and downloads.

After an initial trial period, the software will cost 99c per month.

The rising smartphone security threat

Malware on smartphones is on the rise and yesterday FireEye revealed that for the first time non-jailbroken iOS devices can now be targeted with malware.

Vodafone said that the software will function without affecting users’ data plans or their device’s battery life.

The parental control feature also allows a browsing cut-off time, blocking internet access after a certain time of day or through specific time periods, for example, during school hours.

“Vodafone is committed to providing a robust, best-in-class network to our customers and security is a fundamental part of our service,” said Marcel de Groot, consumer director at Vodafone Ireland.

“We introduced Vodafone Secure Net to ensure that our customers can protect themselves, and their children, from unsafe and unsuitable browsing easily and at limited cost.”

Smartphone security image via Shutterstock

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com