BTYSTE day 2: Mathematical roulette, machine learning and 3D-printed limbs

12 Jan 201710 Shares

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

On the second day of the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition 2017, we talk to students behind projects spanning biology, machine learning, RFID and advanced maths. Image: Connor McKenna

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Day two of the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition (BTYSTE) revealed the enormous breadth of ambition and scope in the scientific minds of Irish schoolkids.

Yesterday saw a distinctly green tint to BTYSTE 2017, with projects ranging from manure bricks to algae oil bioreactors. On the second day of this year’s student showcase, we talked to students behind six very interesting projects.

The innovative creations span biology, machine learning, RFID, advanced maths and e-cigarettes, featuring students from schools in Limerick, Athlone, Cork, Galway and Kildare.

‘There are more girls than boys taking part, with a ratio of 602 girls to 540 boys’

These were just a smattering of the exhibits on display, with more than 550 projects selected from a total of 2,091 from 375 schools.

Out of the 1,142 students, there are more girls than boys taking part, with a ratio of 602 girls to 540 boys.

Cork is the county with the strongest attendance at BTYSTE 2017, with 125 students in attendance, ahead of Dublin, which has 84 entries.

Groundbreaking science projects

In the video below, we spoke to Enya Nordon and Gráinne Lawlor from Scoil Mhuire Community School in Clane, Co Kildare about their research into the harmful effects of dry burning an electronic cigarette.

We spoke to Calum O’Donnell, Patrick Lis and Kieran Murphy from Ardscoil Uí Urmoltaigh in Cork about the maths of a rigged roulette wheel, whereby they examined the probability distribution in an old fairground roulette wheel, and the factors that influence the degree of bias of the wheel.

BTYSTE day 2: Mathematical roulette, machine learning and 3D printed limbs

Kieran Murphy, Calum O’Donnell and Patrick Lis from Ardscoil Uí Urmoltaigh. Image: Connor McKenna

Limerick student Cian O’Donnell from Ardscoil Rís was able to demonstrate how he used 3D-printing technology and software to generate prosthetic limbs at a fraction of the cost. He also generated a 3D-printed hand that could lift and grip objects for a young girl in Africa who was missing the appendage.

Athlone Community College students Andrea White and Amy Fallon showed how it was possible to use machine learning to predict when a mobile phone or charger might explode, a technology they agree could have saved Samsung a lot of money in recent months with the recall of the Note7.

BTYSTE day 2: Mathematical roulette, machine learning and 3D printed limbs

Andrea White and Amy Fallon from Athlone Community College, who developed technology that uses machine learning to prevent phones from going on fire. Image: Connor McKenna

We spoke to Alaidh Fox and Deirdre Hughes from Coláiste Bhaile Chláir in Galway about their creation of an RFID bracelet, which, when combined with a Python programme on a Raspberry Pi device, could help in the administration of medicine to the blind and elderly using audio descriptors.

We also spoke to Limerick students Sinead Hunt and Caoimhe Ní Fhlannabhra from Colaiste Íde agus Iosef about their project, which investigated the effect of protein milk on muscular strength.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com