Mapics makes a move to the Midlands


13 Oct 2003

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Mapics, a developer of software and services for manufacturing and supply chain management, plans to establish a technical support and shared services centre in Athlone.

The Westmeath facility, which is being set up with support from IDA Ireland, will service Mapics’ Europe, Middle East and Africa customers. Located at the Monksland Business Park, it will employ 55 people in a variety of roles including software localisation and testing, IT support and financial management.

In a statement announcing the news, the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment said that the jobs would primarily be filled by staff with degrees and diplomas in software development, engineering, accounting and multilingual skills.

Commenting on the news, Tánaiste Mary Harney TD said: “This investment is the result of the company’s strategy to plan for future growth and to have just two international focal points, Athlone and Singapore. This places the Athlone operation at the heart of Mapics’ future global business strategy. This project contributes to IDA Ireland’s objective of attracting high quality investment to the BMW [border and Midwest] region in Ireland. It will enhance Athlone as an attractive location for software companies where the required qualified and skilled people are available.”

Nasdaq-quoted Mapics employs 800 people worldwide and had revenues of over $128m, with net profits of $13.7m, for 2002. Its software is used by mid-sized manufacturers and subsidiaries of large corporations. The company has more than 50 existing customer sites in Ireland including APC, Shannon Aircraft and Pratt & Whitney. Last year the company established a direct sales presence in the country for the first time, through its partner Open Business Solutions, which has an office in Dublin.

By Gordon Smith