Nokia files another lawsuit against Apple

29 Mar 2011

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Mobile giant Nokia has filed another lawsuit against Apple with the International Trade Commission – this time alleging Apple infringes its patents across all its product lines.

Nokia alleges its patents are now being used by Apple to create key features in its products in the areas of multi-tasking operating systems, data synchronisation, positioning, call quality and the use of Bluetooth accessories.

Nokia and Apple have been suing and countersuing one another over patents this past year.

“This second ITC complaint follows the initial determination in Nokia’s earlier ITC filing, announced by the ITC on Friday, March 25. Nokia does not agree with the ITC’s initial determination that there was no violation of Section 337 in that complaint and is waiting to see the full details of the ruling before deciding on the next steps in that case,” Nokia said in a statement.

In addition to the two ITC complaints, Nokia has filed cases on the same patents and others in Delaware, US, and has further cases proceeding in Mannheim, Dusseldorf and the Federal Patent Court in Germany, the UK High Court in London and the District Court of the Hague in the Netherlands, some of which will come to trial in the next few months.

46 Nokia patents in suit against Apple

“Our latest ITC filing means we now have 46 Nokia patents in suit against Apple, many filed more than 10 years before Apple made its first iPhone,” said Paul Melin, vice-president, intellectual property, at Nokia.

“Nokia is a leading innovator in technologies needed to build great mobile products and Apple must stop building its products using Nokia’s proprietary innovation,” Melin said.

During the last two decades, Nokia has invested about €43bn in research and development.

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com