Programme lets researchers work while they complete master’s degree or PhD


17 Jul 2011

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The Irish Research Council’s Employment Based Postgraduate Programme is a new initiative offering an employment-focused post-graduate experience.

The programme offers researchers the opportunity to complete a master’s degree or PhD degree while being employed by a private company or public organisation based in the Republic of Ireland. Its aim is to educate researchers at master’s and PhD level with an insight into business aspects of research and innovation, and facilitate research collaboration, knowledge transfer and networking between Irish-based enterprise and researchers at Irish Higher Education Institutions.

The programme will accept applications from researchers across all research disciplines with the support of an eligible Higher Education Institution and a company or public organisation.

Successful researchers will be registered as a post-graduate researcher in the Higher Education Institution but will be employed by the employment participant for the duration of the programme.  

The schedule for the first (pilot) call of the new Employment Based Postgraduate Programme is as follows:

·        Pre-call notification: 26 June

·        Call documentation and guidelines published: 29 June

·        Online application system open for submissions: 2 July-25 September

·        Assessment process: October 2012

·        Award of notification: End of October 2012

The Employment Based Postgraduate Programme is sponsored and funded by the Department of Education and Skills through the Irish Research Council, with further financial support by the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine.

Applicants may begin the registration and application process online.

Researchers image via Shutterstock

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DAYS

4

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26

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