Two men and a woman in business attire stand outside a small distillery, each carrying large white umbrellas to take shelter from the rain.
David Ryan and Qaseem Shaikh from Sendoso, pictured with Viki Baird, MD of Stillgarden Distillery. Image: Marc O’Sullivan

Sendoso gives the gift of software engineering jobs at new Dublin HQ

7 Oct 2021

Sendoso is currently seeking a permanent site and warehouse in the Irish capital for its European headquarters.

San Francisco’s Sendoso has chosen Dublin as the location for its European headquarters, creating 100 new jobs in the Irish capital.

Among these jobs created will be roles in software engineering. Jobs available immediately in Dublin include a solutions architect, software engineers up to senior level, and a senior technical recruiter.

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Founded in 2016, Sendoso supports its clients in sending corporate gifts, personalised merchandise, branded swag, e-gifts and virtual experiences at scale.

“The people we hire in this next phase of our global expansion will have a direct and meaningful impact on Sendoso’s trajectory as a category leader,” said company president and COO Michelle Palleschi.

“We are looking to speak with intellectually curious, smart and kind people that will be excited by having a direct impact on our best-in-class product offering and our customer experience. We are also seeking software engineers who want to share their knowledge and expertise and provide us with the best solutions.”

Sendoso has currently taken up residence in a temporary office in Dublin while a permanent site is sought. It will also establish a company warehouse as part of the new HQ.

This warehouse could well be stocked with gifts from Irish SMEs as Sendoso intends to source local products to add to its corporate gifting catalogue.

“While our sights are global, we have a firm commitment to local growth,” said David Ryan, who will lead Sendoso’s European HQ.

“We intend therefore to become a real player for the Irish economy and want to work with Irish SMEs in expanding their presence not only on a national level but on a global scale.”

Chief technology officer Qaseem Shaikh was also in Dublin for the announcement. Shaikh started his own software engineering career with Amazon, Amazon Web Services and Disney Interactive. He moved into software engineering management while at The Climate Corporation, a company that was acquired by Monsanto in a reported billion-dollar deal.

At Sendoso, Shaikh is interested in using automation to enable the company’s delivery of gifts at scale, as well as the integration of machine learning and AI into the platform.

Sendoso is backed by $152m in venture funding and its move into Dublin follows a $100m Series C fundraise, which will enable the company to further expand globally. It currently employs more than 500 people across the US, Europe and the APAC region, and expects to grow this workforce by 30pc by the end of this year.

The company’s clients including Comcast, Thomson Reuters, Nasdaq and eBay.

The establishment of its European headquarters in Dublin is supported by the Government through IDA Ireland.

Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Leo Varadkar, TD, welcomed the creation of “highly skilled jobs” in Dublin, “offering some good opportunities for those working in software engineering, business development, supply chain and customer service”.

“I’m also glad to see Sendoso adding Irish products to its inventory, which will provide a welcome boost to local SMEs and suppliers,” Varadkar added.

For the announcement, Ryan and Shaikh made a visit to Stillgarden Distillery, an independent craft distillery in Inchicore, Dublin. Stillgarden is one of the Irish producers to be included in the Sendoso gift catalogue.

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Elaine Burke
By Elaine Burke

Elaine Burke is editor of Silicon Republic, having served a few years as managing editor up to 2019. She joined in 2011 as a journalist covering gadgets, new media and tech jobs. She comes from a background in publishing and is known for being particularly pernickety when it comes to spelling and grammar – earning her the nickname, Critical Red Pen.

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