DCU Alpha IoT cluster to support 100 companies and 800 jobs
DCU Alpha plans to support 100 companies and 800 jobs over the next three years with a focus on internet of things (IoT) technologies.

DCU Alpha IoT cluster to support 100 companies and 800 jobs

9 Dec 2015126 Shares

The revamped DCU Innovation Campus, now known as DCU Alpha, has revealed plans to support 100 companies and 800 jobs over the next three years with a focus on internet of things (IoT) technologies.

The Alpha location has become a hotbed of next-generation innovation over the last two years, with the tenant and partner line-up featuring a mix of companies, including Enterprise Ireland-backed high-potential start-ups, successful indigenous tech SMEs and IDA-supported multinationals across a variety of sectors, including clean tech, wearable sensors, connected health, industrial automation and machine-to-machine communications.

Among the first companies to create new jobs is Irish start-up Neosfar, which has announced 30 new jobs at a new state-of-the-art facility.

“We are delighted to announce these highly skilled jobs as we embark on servicing the burgeoning IoT sector from our new base in DCU Alpha,” said Neosfar CEO Mark McCarville.

“We already know and work with many of the companies based here and that cluster or cross-fertilisation opportunity, coupled with the access to graduate talent and key researchers in DCU, made this location an ideal one from our perspective. We look forward to moving into our custom-designed engineering lab and office space over the coming weeks and we are already well progressed in terms of hiring the key staff we need.”

Indian software multinational NIIT Ltd has also announced that its new European delivery centre will be located at DCU Alpha.

Spanish Lalla, president of NIIT’s corporate learning group, outlined the rationale behind its move.

“Europe is an important market for us and Ireland was our country of choice for our European delivery centre. As soon as we engaged with DCU, we knew that Alpha was the right location in terms of its culture of innovation and the nearby access to key research centres and the availability of creative and technical talent in the main university.”

‘DCU Alpha is rapidly becoming recognised as a cornerstone of DCU’s reputation as Ireland’s university of enterprise’
– PROF BRIAN MACCRAITH, DCU

The Dublin City University (DCU) innovation cluster has become home to more than 30 companies and 350 jobs since being established in late 2013 on the site of an old Enterprise Ireland campus in Glasnevin.

DCU Alpha is a nine-acre, 200,000 sq ft office, laboratory and industrial research facility, situated approximately 800 metres from the main DCU campus.

The office, laboratory and industrial research facility in DCU Alpha has evolved into a group of innovative companies actively bridging the digital and physical divide with new IoT technologies.  DCU Alpha now plans to grow to 100 companies and 800 jobs over the next three years under its new brand identity, double the amount envisaged under the 2013 Action Plan for Jobs.

Ireland’s university of enterprise

“DCU Alpha is rapidly becoming recognised as a cornerstone of DCU’s reputation as Ireland’s university of enterprise,” said Prof Brian MacCraith, president of DCU.

“It has been encouraging to see the high level of engagement by businesses large and small over the last two years as they leverage the research, talent and support of DCU.

“The next three years are going to be equally as exciting as we look to grow the amount of partner companies from 30 to 100 and continue to expand the number of jobs supported here, as well as the number of innovation partnerships between the university and our industry partners.”

A huge boost for Dublin’s northside

The expanded focus of the DCU Alpha innovation cluster was also welcomed by Jobs Minister Richard Bruton.

“Two-thirds of all new jobs are created by start-ups in their first five years of existence – that is why as part of the Action Plan for Jobs we are putting in place a range of measures to support entrepreneurs.

“Crucial in this is incubator and accelerator spaces and innovation clusters – facilities for companies to locate in their early years of existence where they can have access to supports and mentoring and, crucially, where they can be close to other entrepreneurs to share experiences and bounce ideas off.

“Today’s announcement that DCU Alpha plans to grow to 100 companies and 800 jobs in the next three years is a huge boost for the north side, and a great indication of what is possible for start-up companies with access to the right supports.”

North Dublin image via Shutterstock

John Kennedy
By John Kennedy

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist. He joined Silicon Republic in 2002 to become the fulcrum of the company’s news service He was recipient of the Irish Internet Association’s NetVisionary Technology Journalist Award 2005 and Siliconrepublic.com has been awarded ‘Best Technology Site’ at the Irish Web Awards seven times. In 2011 he received the David Manley Award commending him for his dedication to covering entrepreneurs. His interests include all things technological, music, movies, reading, history, gaming and losing the occasional game of poker.

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