DSE encourages students to keep STEM courses on their CAO forms

27 Jun 2012

As the Central Applications Office (CAO) ‘change of mind’ deadline approaches, Discover Science and Engineering (DSE) is encouraging students who have just completed their Leaving Certificate examinations to keep science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) courses in mind.

CAO ‘change of mind’ forms will no longer be accepted after 1 July, and Dr Graham Love, director of DSE and director of policy and communications at Science Foundation Ireland, is urging students to think of the opportunities STEM courses can afford them.

“Science and engineering subjects offer extensive, exciting and varied career opportunities for young graduates,” he said, citing the 4,000 technology jobs for Ireland already announced this year, and further investment in Ireland from companies such as Amazon.

Applications for STEM courses increasing

Engineers Ireland has highlighted that the number of engineers in Ireland needs to increase from 40,000 to 110,000 by the year 2020 for the country to become a top 5 global economy.

The CAO announced there has been an 18pc increase in the number of applications by school-leavers for STEM courses this year, a clear indication of the growing awareness of the key areas driving the jobs of the future. This figure could increase even more following the weekend deadline.

“I congratulate students that have already made the decision to undertake a science, technology or engineering-related course at third level and I encourage those who may be filling out their change of mind form this week to consider such courses,” said Dr Love. “Science and engineering graduates are among the highest-paid graduates in Ireland. Government policy and the continuing flow of inward investment prove that these sectors will provide a viable and sustainable economic future.”

Image of scientific researchers via Shutterstock

Elaine Burke
By Elaine Burke

Elaine Burke is managing editor of Siliconrepublic.com. She joined in 2011 as a journalist covering gadgets, new media and tech jobs news. She comes from a background in publishing and is known for being particularly persnickety when it comes to spelling and grammar – earning her the nickname, Critical Red Pen. When she hasn’t got her nose stuck in her laptop, you’ll find her in the kitchen, at the cinema, or on the dancefloor.

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