Cork, Galway and Dublin jobs boost as three companies set up shop
More jobs are coming to Ireland. From left: Andrew Parish, ConnectIreland; Jessie White, Snapstory; AJ Leon, Misfits; Joanna Murphy, CEO, ConnectIreland. Image: Paul Sherwood

Cork, Galway and Dublin jobs boost as three companies set up shop

22 Mar 201754 Shares

Three businesses have chosen Ireland for their new hubs, with Cork, Galway and Dublin benefiting from 35 new jobs.

ConnectIreland has had a good day, with news of three companies entering Ireland through the scheme, setting up international operations in various locations.

A total of 35 jobs are being created across the companies, with the geographical spread as varied as the industries the new businesses operate in.

Jobs in Ireland, Galway, Cork, Dublin

Jobs in Ireland

The 12 new Dublin jobs are with software company Kochava, based at the Fitzwilliam Business Centre in the city centre. This new European HQ will work on product support and regional sales for clients and prospective clients. The main functions of the operations will include sales, marketing, and technical support.

US-based Misfits Inc is heading to Galway, setting up its global HQ and creating 13 new jobs at its start-up subsidiary, Snapstory. The new Snapstory enterprise android application allows NGOs and non-profits to measure, evaluate and tell authentic stories about the work they do across the world.

Meanwhile, Wavepower Technologies, a UK company investigating wave energy, is establishing a future development research group at The Entrepreneur Ship in Ringaksiddy, Cork, creating up to 10 advanced engineering research jobs.

This is an industry that’s exploding into life, particularly for businesses based on Ireland’s Atlantic coast.

Last year, for example, FORESEA (Funding Ocean Renewable Energy through Strategic European Action) was launched to help enterprises develop low-carbon energy technologies in real sea environments.

SmartBay, a Galway-based company, was a primary driver on this project and, along with several other operators in this space, is helping turn Ireland into a bit of a wave technology global hub.

Making waves

“We recognise the incredible cluster of expertise, resources and research facilities in Ringaskiddy and are excited to become part of this community,” said Wavepower CEO Prof Mark Gillan.

“We look forward to being an active member of the marine innovation ecosystem in Ireland, and benefiting from Ireland’s track record in innovation in the renewable energy environment.”

Jobs in Cork | From left: Simon Coveney, Minister for Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government, TD; Rubie Todd, co-founder of Wavepower Technologies; Joanna Murphy, CEO Connect Ireland

From left: Simon Coveney, Minister for Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government, TD; Rubie Todd, co-founder of Wavepower Technologies; Joanna Murphy, CEO Connect Ireland

Earlier today, fintech and regtech player Fenergo revealed plans to nearly double its workforce to meet demand, announcing that it is to hire 200 staff over the next 18 months.

Regulating the fintech world – commonly known as regtech – will define many financial institutions and players in the years to come, with the advent of initiatives like PSD2 and the Markets in Financial Instruments repealing Directive (MiFID II) landing in 2018.

Fenergo provides software solutions for investment, corporate and private banks to manage the regulatory onboarding and entity data management processes.

The roles that Fenergo is looking to fill include product management, software engineering, implementation, consulting and marketing.

Jobs in Ireland Galway, Cork, Dublin

Gordon Hunt
By Gordon Hunt

Gordon joined Silicon Republic in October 2014 as a journalist, moving on to a new position as senior communications and content executive at NDRC in August 2017. Unafraid of heights or spiders, Gordon spends most of his time avoiding conversations about music, appreciating even the least creative pun and rueing the day he panicked when meeting Paul McGrath. His favourite thing on the internet remains the ‘Random Article’ link on Wikipedia.

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