NovaUCD Innovation Award-winner Logentries creates 20 jobs in Dublin
Dr Trevor Parsons and Dr Villiam Holub, co-founders of Logentries, with their NovaUCD 2013 Innovation Award. Photo by Nick Bradshaw

NovaUCD Innovation Award-winner Logentries creates 20 jobs in Dublin

17 Dec 20132 Shares

University College Dublin (UCD) spin-out Logentries has received the NovaUCD 2013 Innovation Award in recognition of its global success and impact. Accepting the award, one of the co-founders revealed new job openings at the company.

Traditionally, log management and analytics solutions require advanced technical skills to use or are costly to set up, but Logentries’ SaaS-based log management service aims to simplify this process, unlocking huge quantities of log event data so it can be used to improve IT and business operations.

Established in 2010 following a decade of joint research with IBM at UCD’s Performance Engineering Laboratory, Logentries has gone on to raise more than US$11m in funding and attract tens of thousands of users in more than 100 countries.

“It is fitting that a company of the calibre of Logentries, which has emerged from UCD’s research focus on big data and the fostering of partnerships by UCD with industry, has been awarded the NovaUCD 2013 Innovation Award,” said Prof Peter Clinch, UCD’s vice-president of innovation.

The award was presented to Logentries co-founders Dr Villiam Holub and Dr Trevor Parsons at an event in NovaUCD, the centre for new ventures and entrepreneurs. On receiving the award, Parson announced plans for the company to double in size. “In the coming months we will be seeking to fill 20 open engineering positions in Dublin, where the company is looking for software developers, data scientists and dev-ops engineers,” he said.

As well as its Dublin base, Logentries has offices in Prague, Czech Republic and Boston in the US.

Elaine Burke
By Elaine Burke

Elaine Burke is managing editor of Siliconrepublic.com. She joined in 2011 as a journalist covering gadgets, new media and tech jobs news. She comes from a background in publishing and is known for being particularly persnickety when it comes to spelling and grammar – earning her the nickname, Critical Red Pen. When she hasn’t got her nose stuck in her laptop, you’ll find her in the kitchen, at the cinema, or on the dancefloor.

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