Intel to award 20 school leavers with 2017 Women in Technology Scholarships
From left: Haley Dixon from Castleknock and Ekaterina Lait from Dundalk, both students at Trinity College Dublin, at the Intel Women in Technology awards evening in Dublin last November. Image: Marc O'Sullivan

Intel to award 20 school leavers with 2017 Women in Technology Scholarships

8 Mar 201717 Shares

Intel Ireland is looking to support and mentor 20 female school leavers who will be entering third level in 2017.

As part of International Women’s Day celebrations, Intel Ireland has launched its Women in Technology Scholarship programme.

Running for more than 10 years, this initiative has seen investment of more than €1m to date.

In 2017, Intel will offer up to 20 awards, which will be available to female school leavers entering (in September 2017) specified four-year undergraduate degree courses in science, technology and engineering.

‘We believe that creating a fully diverse and inclusive workplace is fundamental to how we deliver business results’
– BRIAN KRZANICH

Intel will offer a monetary grant valued at €3,000 per annum as well as opportunities for work placements at one of the company’s Ireland locations in Leixlip and Shannon.

Each scholar is also assigned an Intel employee as a mentor, to assist and provide advice on managing their academic career.

The scholarship programme is part of a broader strategy to support the attraction, growth and development of diverse talent that makes companies such as Intel thrive.

Intel is bold for change

Intel to award 20 school leavers with 2017 Women in Technology Scholarships

From left: Ekaterina Lait from Dundalk, Haley Dixon from Castleknock and Ellen Cronin from Killarney (studying at UCD) at the Intel Women in Technology awards evening in Dublin last November. Image: Marc O’Sullivan

Embracing this year’s International Women’s Day call to action #BeBoldForChange, Intel said it wants to help forge a better, more inclusive and gender-equal working world.

An Intel spokesperson said that the scholarship programme aims to encourage a new generation of high-achieving women to take up the challenge of a career in science and technology.

Earlier this month, Intel released its 2016 Diversity and Inclusion Annual Report, which shows the progress the company has made toward its goal of reaching full representation of women and under-represented minorities in its US workforce.

Intel exceeded the 2016 hiring target with 45.1pc diverse hiring, and is committed to surpassing this in 2017.

Positive gains were also made in the overall representation of women, which rose 2.3 points since 2014 to 25.8pc.

“We hit our year-end goal of achieving 100pc pay parity for both women and under-represented minorities, and achieved promotion parity … as well,” Intel said.

In January 2015, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich announced the Diversity in Technology initiative, which includes a bold new hiring and retention goal to achieve full representation of women and under-represented minorities at Intel by 2020.

Intel also committed to spend $300m over five years in support of that goal.

“We believe that creating a fully diverse and inclusive workplace is fundamental to how we deliver business results,” said Krzanich.

“As technology and markets continue to evolve, building and growing a workforce that is fully representative of the customers we serve and communities in which we operate is paramount to our success.”

John Kennedy
By John Kennedy

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist. He joined Silicon Republic in 2002 to become the fulcrum of the company’s news service He was recipient of the Irish Internet Association’s NetVisionary Technology Journalist Award 2005 and Siliconrepublic.com has been awarded ‘Best Technology Site’ at the Irish Web Awards seven times. In 2011 he received the David Manley Award commending him for his dedication to covering entrepreneurs. His interests include all things technological, music, movies, reading, history, gaming and losing the occasional game of poker.

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