The need for staff retention actually fuels job surge in Ireland (infographic)

14 Apr 20151 Share

More and more companies are targeting a staff retention model it seems, with a spike in HR roles available in Ireland. Elsewhere, engineering is seeing a significant spike in interest.

Morgan McKinley’s latest employment monitor shows that job creation for professionals continues to soar, up an impressive 27pc on Q1 last year.

The four areas of real growth were HR, multilingual staff, financial services and engineering. Indeed the interest in HR professionals reflects the push to retain staff, with positions emerging for those with employee engagement and retention skill sets.

The multilingual pressure comes, of course, from the IT sector, where the swathe of EMEA offices and the like require staff that can deal with people from all over the world.

“In 2015 to date, traditional languages such as French, Spanish and German remain in high demand, along with Nordic, Finnish and Russian,” says Bryan Hyland, Morgan McKinley operations director.

“Ireland’s reputation internationally in life sciences and the pharma sector has remained consistently strong and new expansionary projects within this sector are providing an active and buoyant market for engineering professionals in the first three months of the year.

“Generally, quarter one has been very positive in terms of hiring activity and is in line with recent CSO figures indicating consecutive growth over the last several quarters. The challenge ahead relates to those sectors and industries where demand is outstripping supply in the Irish market.”

Boss retains employee image, via Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt
By Gordon Hunt

Gordon joined Silicon Republic in October 2014 as a journalist, moving on to pastures new in August 2017. Unafraid of heights or spiders, Gordon spends most of his time avoiding conversations about music, appreciating even the least creative pun and rueing the day he panicked when meeting Paul McGrath. His favourite thing on the internet remains the ‘Random Article’ link on Wikipedia.

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