3G iPhone by June 2008


7 Dec 2007

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A new, improved iPhone with 3G functionality is set to replace the EDGE data transfer network by June 2008 at the latest, according to CNBC news reporter Jim Goldman who cites a source close to the company manufacturing the handset.

This 3G functionality was already tipped for production by Apple CEO Steve Jobs at the UK launch of the iPhone last month and last week confirmed by AT&T Randall Stephenson, but until now no definite release dates had been discussed.

Unlike the US where EDGE, or 2.75G, technology is quite common, the mobile handset market in Europe is dominated by 3G technology which is faster and more reliable for the streaming video, media downloads and reliable internet surfing that the iPhone is designed for.

Meanwhile Goldman also reported on what revelations were expected at Macworld 2008, the January conference and expo where each year Apple reveals the latest product developments as well as traditionally revealing at least one entirely new product.

While last year’s Macworld saw the introduction of the iPhone, Goldman reports that this year we will see a super-slim, reduced version of the Apple’s notebook PC, the MacBook.

The new MacBook will reportedly be 50pc thinner than the current one with the biggest change coming in the form of Flash memory, which will replace the hard drive. Currently the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) XO PC does this, which enables cheaper production and smaller size.

The MacBook ‘mini’ is said to have a 12-inch screen and to retail at approximately US$1,500.

More news from sources at Apple’s manufacturing base also claimed that the iPhone’s sister gadget the iPod Touch is flying off the shelves in the run-up to Christmas, prompting the manufacturer to produce 5.1 million units for this quarter.

By Marie Boran