Facebook ‘Like’ button’s first birthday – 10,000 sites add daily

22 Apr 2011

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When you look at the Facebook button, it is so ubiquitous that it feels like it has been there forever on the web – yet it’s been around just one year and would you believe 10,000 sites are adding the button on a daily basis.

Within nine hours of announcing its anniversary, ironically just fewer than 60,000 people pressed the ‘Like’ button. It will no doubt be interesting, the kind of figures Facebook will present when its recently launched Facebook Places location-based tool reaches its first anniversary.

The idea was to bring the Facebook social graph beyond the walls of Facebook and back into users’ social stream. Today, people can ‘Like’ videos, articles, items of fashion, you name it. Retailers and publishers are seeing the intrinsic value of the approach and you would rarely read an article or see an item of social media you can’t simply share by clicking ‘Like’.

‘Like’ the strategy Facebook

The strategy is working out quite beautifully for Facebook. Every month, more than 250m people engage with Facebook on external websites.

According to Facebook’s own statistics, since social plugins launched in April 2010, an average of 10,000 new websites integrate with Facebook every day.

More than 2.5m websites have integrated with Facebook, including more than 80 of comScore’s US Top 100 websites and more than half of comScore’s Global Top 100 websites.

In addition, out of Facebook’s 500m strong audience, there are more than 250m active users accessing Facebook via mobile devices and those who use Facebook on their mobile devices are twice as active on Facebook than non-mobile users.

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com