Google+ gets revamp: Is this its last throw of the dice?

18 Nov 201548 Shares

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Like the Zune trying to push out the might of the iPod, Google’s social network Google+ continues to fight against the tide, pinning its last hope on a total revamp of its appearance.

Ask someone you know whether they have a Google+ account and they’ll probably say yes. If you followed that up with whether they use it even on a semi-regular basis, they’ll more than likely say no.

Google’s attempt at a social network has been around since 2011, but has simply just not attracted the level of interest that, say, Facebook has for people’s personal lives or LinkedIn has for business networking, largely due to confusion over what its purpose actually is.

Well now, refusing to give in, Google’s rare unsuccessful venture is getting a visual overhaul, largely bringing it in line with its own major rebranding and design changes following it being made a subsidiary of Alphabet.

According to Google’s blog post on the matter, the ‘Google++’ will be geared particularly towards its Communities and Collections features, which it hopes will attract people who want to follow a particular interest or topic, rather than an individual.

“Today,” Google said, “we’re starting to introduce a fully redesigned Google+ that puts Communities and Collections front and centre. Now focused around interests, the new Google+ is much simpler.”

“[Communities and Collections] are the places on Google+ where people around the world are spending their time discovering and sharing things they love.”

As part of its cleaner redesign, it has also become more mobile friendly. Google+ users might not see any changes, however, unless they decide to opt into the new look in its social network.

Google+ image via spaxiax/Shutterstock

Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com