It’s time for a smart wedding with a bride’s eye view

18 Jun 20151 Share

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A model poses wearing one of two Sony 4K ActionCam bridal veils.

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The Internet of Things (IoT) has reached a new peak, with the dawn of the smart wedding, where brides film everything they see.

It’s something everybody wants to capture: every second of your wedding day, from the point of view of the bride.

Finally, it’s here. Finally, IoT has caught up with one of our oldest, most predictable traditions.

Sony has just partnered with fashion designer Rosie Olivia to create the ever-needed first ‘wearable technology wedding veils collection’.

Wedding footage - A bride's view of the groom, if that's your thing, via Mikael Buck

A bride’s view of the groom, if that’s your thing, via Mikael Buck

It’s designed to “capture a unique view of matrimony, from the bride’s eyeline”, and mounts a Sony’s 4K FDR-X1000V. Because of course it does.

Although, when you think about it, this could render selfie-sticks obsolete, although as evidenced by some of the promotional snaps, that may not prove possible…

Wedding footage - Example shots showing the images a bride might take, via Mikael Buck

Example shots showing the images a bride might take, via Mikael Buck

“Too many of my friends have complained about their lack of wedding videography,” says Olivia.

“The Bride’s Eye View collection will mean the most important vows are captured forever. With my own wedding on the way, my essentials will be something borrowed, something blue and the chance to capture your wedding with a bride’s eye view.”

Wedding footage - The camera connected to the wedding veil, via Mikael Buck

The camera connected to the wedding veil, via Mikael Buck

Gigglebit is Siliconrepublic’s daily dose of the funny and fantastic in science and tech, to help start your day on a lighter note – because sometimes the lighter side of STEM should be taken seriously, too.

Gordon Hunt is a journalist at Siliconrepublic.com

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