TXT-Aid to help China and Burma disaster victims


22 May 2008

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After topping up your mobile phone credit this week, take a minute to text the word ‘AID’ to 57500 and €2.50 worth of your credit will go towards helping earthquake victims in China and cyclone victims in Burma (Myanmar) through four Irish charities.

TXT-Aid was launched today by Irish mobile marketing specialist Púca and will run for the next two weeks. It is supported by the four main mobile operators: O2, Vodafone, Meteor and 3.

All proceeds from these texts will be divided between the Irish Red Cross, Oxfam Ireland, Trócaire and Concern Worldwide and go to help disaster relief efforts in the earthquake-stricken Sichuan province in China, as well as cyclone victims in Burma.

“The mobile phone is an incredibly powerful medium for instant response,” said Eamon Hession, CEO of Púca.

“Making a donation is literally as easy as sending a text message. Irish people are amongst the heaviest users of SMS texting in the world. We’ve all seen the upsetting pictures over the past two weeks from Myanmar and from China – the scale of the tragedy unfolding is difficult to even comprehend.

“We want to harness the goodwill of the Irish public to respond as quickly and effectively as possible to provide whatever help we can to the victims of these disasters. What better way than with our mobile phones?”

With over five million mobile phone users in Ireland alone, we can easily make a difference with just one text to 57500.

“We urge the Irish public to support TXT-Aid and donate today in support of all aid organisations working in the disaster regions,” said Peter Anderson, fundraising manager from Oxfam Ireland.

“This is your chance to play a part in assisting the millions of people affected. From just one text message, we could supply a special water bucket designed by Oxfam to keep water safe and clean in emergencies.”

By Marie Boran