Software development manager from India calls Ireland home
Dheraj Kumar, software development manager, Accenture Ireland

Software development manager from India calls Ireland home

4 Feb 20142 Shares

With people from all over the world choosing Ireland as a place to live and work, we speak to those that have put down roots in the country. This time, we talk to Dheraj Kumar, a software development manager at Accenture Ireland.

Where are you from?

I’m from Jabalpur, which is one of the major cities in the state of Madhya Pradesh in India. It has a population of around 2.5m.

The region is dotted with marble rocks that have added to the fame of the place, which compels tourists to flock there and witness the natural marvel.

Jabalpur has a hot temperate climate; the maximum temperature is recorded during summers when it surpasses the 47°C mark, whereas winters record a minimum of 8°C.

The culture of Jabalpur is quite an interesting mix, rich in tradition and diverse in ambience.

How long have you been in Ireland?

I have been in Ireland since February 2001.

Why did you move here?

It was my first year working for an IT company in India when they decided to expand their operations and open an office in Dublin. I was offered a role in the Dublin office, which prompted me to do some research on Ireland. I found that Ireland was the biggest software exporter in the world at that time, with huge opportunities in the field of information technology, which I believed was good for my career.

On arrival, I found the people very friendly and welcoming and, as I explored the country, I was mesmerised with the natural beauty. It did not take long to figure out that I was going to be here for the long haul.

What work do you do?

I’m a software development manager at a global management consulting and technology company.

How would you describe your working environment?

My organisation believes that the company’s success depends on the success of its people. It is a place where the best people work together as a team to enable clients to become high-performance businesses. It provides a dynamic work environment which allows people to take advantage of a variety of opportunities to tailor one’s career, develop specialised expertise and grow professionally.

What do you like most about your job?

It is definitely not a unique response and, as cliché as it may sound, it is the people that I have met and worked with, and those who have inspired me over the last 12 years.

Was it difficult to adjust to living and working in Ireland?

Not at all. I found the Irish people fun-loving and friendly. I was met with a smile wherever I went. I have always enjoyed a friendly banter with my friends.

I adapted well as I was among people with a great sense of humour who lived life to the fullest and lived in the moment. Colleagues at work were always ready to help and a couple of pints after work gave the perfect opportunity to break the ice.

What surprised you about moving to Ireland?

Striking similarities between the Irish and Indian culture; like, in both cultures, people love chatting over a cup of tea.

I am a nature-lover and was fascinated by the stunning landscapes and the green scenery.

Also, the fact that all the seasons can be experienced in a single day – it can be very sunny and all of a sudden, out of the blue, comes rain! Hours of extended daylight during summer keeps the spirits high, though.

How does your working life help to make you feel at home here?

I have lived here for nearly 13 years and my two children were born and have grown up here. Ireland feels like home.

What do you like most about your adopted home?

I love the enthusiasm on St Patrick’s Day, the spirit of the people, beautiful landscapes, the phrases and accent used in everyday conversation, Irish dance, Irish music and, last but not the least, the little nod given to people in the street that you hardly know.

Elaine Burke
By Elaine Burke

Elaine Burke is managing editor of Siliconrepublic.com. She joined in 2011 as a journalist covering gadgets, new media and tech jobs news. She comes from a background in publishing and is known for being particularly persnickety when it comes to spelling and grammar – earning her the nickname, Critical Red Pen. When she hasn’t got her nose stuck in her laptop, you’ll find her in the kitchen, at the cinema, or on the dancefloor.

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