Batman: Arkham Night pulled from PC after just one day

25 Jun 2015

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Batman: Arkham Night – al images via official game site

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Warner Bros Interactive has taken the surprising step to suspend sales of Batman: Arkham night on PC, just one day after its full release, after buyers complained of numerous issues.

The final iteration of the Batman: Arkham series was only launched on Tuesday, with Xbox and PS4 users perfectly happy with what’s on offer. However, PC users instantly took to message boards complaining of graphics issues and horrid frame rates.

And Warner Bros has taken those complaints so seriously that it has suspended sales until a patch can be issued.

“We want to apologise to those of you who are experiencing performance issues with Batman: Arkham Knight on PC,” the company’s statement said.

“We take these issues very seriously and have therefore decided to suspend future game sales of the PC version while we work to address these issues to satisfy our quality standards.

“We greatly value our customers and know that while there are a significant amount of players who are enjoying the game on PC, we want to do whatever we can to make the experience better for PC players overall.”

Batman: Arkham Night

Time is asked for while a fix is made, but those who want a refund can go ahead and apply. Steam’s refunds are applicable within 14 days of a game’s purchase if you have only played the game for two hours.

“But even if you fall outside of the refund rules we’ve described, you can ask for a refund anyway and we’ll take a look,” says Steam.

It seems pretty amazing that QA testing let a game pass for PC that was so bad it was pulled within hours, but I guess acting this fast is a positive of sorts.

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com